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You walk out of your interview feeling great. You were nicely dressed, well-spoken, and answered every question spot-on.

What do you do now?

The answer is extremely simple: the next day, send a brief email to the person who interviewed you. If it’s a high-level job, a physical card in the mail would be even better. Whether it’s an email or a physical note, here’s what it should cover:

  • Thank you for meeting with me
  • I enjoyed learning x, y, and z about your company
  • I am excited about this role
  • Thank you again for your time
  • I look forward to hearing from you soon

That’s it. See? It’s almost ridiculously simple.

So what’s the point of it? It reinforces your name in the interviewer’s mind. It shows that you care about this job. It shows that you’ll go an extra step in communications.

The only way we’ve seen this backfire is when a follow-up email turns into a case of TMI. We’ve known applicants who interview well, score well on our software tests…and then they go home, send us an email–usually late at night–and completely ruin that good impression.

Unemployment is a stressful situation. We understand that stress can transform people in ways they could never have imagined. When you over-share your personal life with a potential employer, though, you cross a line. That line is called Professionalism. Once you cross it, it can be very hard to return to the other side. It’s even harder because now the interviewer really knows your name…because, of course, you followed up.

So when you do a post-interview follow up, make sure you’re still following the interview rules. Be articulate. Convey professionalism. It might not even hurt to be nicely dressed. Just please, no pictures! 😱

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